Viewing entries tagged
history of art and architecture

Bret Rothstein on the Playful Intersection of Games and Art History

Bret Rothstein on the Playful Intersection of Games and Art History

Indiana University, Bloomington professor and UC Santa Barbara alumnus Bret Rothstein delivered a recent presentation titled “The Cheat, the Spoilsport, and the Virtuoso” to UCSB history of art & architecture students and faculty, describing the role of games in 16th century European artwork.

Coming to UCSB: Embark on a Virtual Excavation in Rome

Coming to UCSB: Embark on a Virtual Excavation in Rome

History of Art and Architecture professor Claudia Moser and Writing Program lecturer Christian Thomas have received a $94,000 grant from UC Santa Barbara’s Innovative Learning Technology Initiative (ILTI) to develop an interactive, game-based course called Rome: The Game. The lower division course, which will be available to students in winter 2021, is an introduction to the art, archaeology, and history of ancient Rome, with an emphasis on writing and research.

We Are All Cartographers: Keith Clarke Explains Digital Mapmaking

We Are All Cartographers: Keith Clarke Explains Digital Mapmaking

To kick off the History of Art and Architecture's Digital Image Lab series, UC Santa Barbara Geography professor Keith Clarke led a Wednesday afternoon mapmaking workshop. "Anybody can sit down in front of a computer and make a map," he said. Though the process initially seemed complex, Clarke showed how digital programs have made it easier to create and access maps.

Art for Therapy’s Sake: Suzanne Hudson looks at the legacy of TV’s Bob Ross

Art for Therapy’s Sake: Suzanne Hudson looks at the legacy of TV’s Bob Ross

Art therapy is not intended to train artists, but to instead make them happy, says Suzanne Hudson, an art history scholar at University of Southern California.

Hudson discussed the advent of art therapy and the role of television’s Bob Ross at UC Santa Barbara’s History of Art and Architecture winter lecture series. She is currently completing the research for her next book, Better For the Making:  Art Therapy Process.