Viewing entries tagged
classics

Political Postures: Citizenship and the Role of Protest

Political Postures: Citizenship and the Role of Protest

Decades before Colin Kaepernick played for the National Football League, world champion boxer Muhammad Ali publicly opposed the Vietnam War and was stripped of his heavyweight title and banned from boxing for years. Recently, Kaepernick has followed in his footsteps and knelt in silence during the national anthem to protest racial injustice, hoping to garner support and promote change as Ali did in 1971.

To Brown University professor Bonnie Honig, Kaepernick and Ali’s actions that demonstrated their refusal to comply to society’s expectations reflects a “long tradition of American citizenship.”

The Late Republic: Shifting Values in Modern America and Ancient Rome

The Late Republic: Shifting Values in Modern America and Ancient Rome

“The societal changes of the Late Roman Republic’s aristocratic class has implications for how historians compare the past to our current political landscape,” scholar Noah Segal said in a recent talk to faculty and students of the Classics department. A decline in military background among those who serve in office is one trend in ancient Rome that echoes today.

Segal, who specializes in populism in democratic societies, will represent UC Santa Barbara at an international Classics convention in early January.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Inspiration and Takeaways in the Humanities & Fine Arts

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Inspiration and Takeaways in the Humanities & Fine Arts

Sasha Nasir, a student in our new Journalism for Web and Social Media course, has produced a video featuring undergraduates in UC Santa Barbara's division of Humanities and Fine Arts explaining what they love about their majors - Classics, Black Studies, Film and Media Studies, and English.