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Brain Yaeger: Sharing Tales of Brewers and Bakers

Brain Yaeger: Sharing Tales of Brewers and Bakers

UC Santa Barbara alum Brian Yaeger is the author of Red, White, and Brew: An American Beer Odyssey and Oregon Breweries. But before he became a published author, he graduated from UCSB in 1996 with a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies. He has now returned to his alma mater to teach a course about beer through UCSB’s Department of Recreation.

 

Interweaving Histories: John Nava Combines Classic and Modern

Interweaving Histories: John Nava Combines Classic and Modern

On Thursday evening, UCSB alumnus and artist John Nava returned to his alma mater to discuss his creative evolution with students, staff, and community members at the Art, Design, and Architecture Museum. Nava channels his fascination with the fine details of the human figure into his work and credits his UCSB art education as the catalyst that led him to discover his artistic voice.

An Award for UCSB Poet Robert Krut’s New Book

An Award for UCSB Poet Robert Krut’s New Book

Writing Program lecturer Robert Krut’s newest book, The Now Dark Sky, Setting Us All on Fire, has been awarded the Codhill Poetry Award by the Codhill Press. The award is given to the poet whose work stood out as the best of the year among all other submitted poetry. “It is always a nice feeling to know that someone appreciated what you’ve written,” Krut said.

A Merging of Opera's Finest Voices

A Merging of Opera's Finest Voices

“Any excessive emotion, that’s where it comes in, because you got nothing but emotion to the rest of the aria,” said mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade, one of the music world’s most beloved figures, mentoring students at a recent UCSB Department of Music’s “Guest Artist Masterclass.” Students Kelly Guerra, Byron Mayes and others brought their best work for von Stade to critique.

Thi Bui: A Story Told in Shades of Orange

Thi Bui: A Story Told in Shades of Orange

“Remember that you’re not trying to prove that you know more than your parents. Instead, you’re allowing yourself to grow and discuss things,” writes author and escapee from South Vietnam Thi Bui. In this piece, Communication and Music Studies student Esther Liu draws connections from the writer’s experiences into her own life as an Asian American.

The Value of Virtue: Calling for a Return to Public and Liberal Education

The Value of Virtue: Calling for a Return to Public and Liberal Education

David Marshall, UC Santa Barbara’s Vice Chancellor, urged universities, including UCSB, to re-prioritize “critical discourse and critical thinking,” when evaluating our system of education. His talk titled "Teaching the People: Enlightenment and the American Republic" was part of the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center’s Social Securities series.

Seeing Ghosts through Photography

Seeing Ghosts through Photography

In a talk that at times felt as intimate as telling stories around a campfire, Peter Manseau, a curator of American religious history at the Smithsonian Institution, explained how the invention of the camera offered consolation to those affected by the Civil War. In his latest book, The Apparitionist,‘ Manseau writes about ‘sprit photographer’ William Mumler who convinced the bereaved to believe that ghosts of the deceased could be captured through photography.

 Discussing Decolonization and Indigenous Identity

Discussing Decolonization and Indigenous Identity

Educators and students gathered at the 6th Annual American Indian and Indigenous Collective Symposium held recently at UC Santa Barbara and sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center. From an indigenous perspective, participants discussed modern decolonization as a means of forging a relationship with one’s roots.

Then and Now: A Retirement Tribute for Historian Sharon Farmer

Then and Now: A Retirement Tribute for Historian Sharon Farmer

Brown University historian Amy Remensnyder honored retiring UC Santa Barbara medieval studies professor Sharon Farmer at a recent colloquium hosted by UCSB’s History department. As a celebration of the professor’s career, Remensnyder and six of Farmer’s previous students presented their own research related to Medieval history.

The Role of Error in Tech Creativity

The Role of Error in Tech Creativity

Adam Kearney, a ‘knowledge engineer’ for Amazon, gave a talk last week to UC Santa Barbara students on how to create new ideas and make them into a success. “I feel like there’s a misconception on what creativity is and where you actually find it to start ideas,” said Kearney. His talk entitled, “Truth Emerges More Readily from Error,” was part of the Media Arts and Technology (MAT) Seminar Series.

"Freedom is an Inside Job" Activist Ericka Huggins Tells Students

"Freedom is an Inside Job" Activist Ericka Huggins Tells Students

In honor of Black History Month⁠, human rights activist Ericka Huggins spoke in the opening event of the Black Student Union’s annual two-day series, Heart and Soul Case. In her talk, “An Evening with Ericka Huggins: Identity, Activism, and Change,” she urged students to step out of the boxes society places them in.

World Music Wednesdays, Rain or Shine

World Music Wednesdays, Rain or Shine

Performing songs from the Jazz Age like “Ladybird,” by Tadd Dameron, and “My Shining Hour,” by John Coltrane, The Matt Perko Quintet captivated a UC Santa Barbara audience during a recent performance for the weekly World Music Series, put on by the UCSB Department of Music and the MultiCultural Center. Wednesdays, outside at the Bowl, or inside when it rains.

Healing the Pain of the Past Through Theater

Healing the Pain of the Past Through Theater

Students and faculty filled nearly all of UC Santa Barbara’s Studio Theater for award-winning playwright and actor Petrona de la Cruz Cruz’s recent performance of her play, Bittersweet Dreams/Dulces y amargos sueños . The play deals with heavy topics such as sexual assault and both de la Cruz Cruz and director Doris Difarnecio  discussed that in a question and answer session after the performance. “Theater has brought me so many places and because of this, I know that my path has many less thorns and stones, and many more flowers,” said de la Cruz Cruz.

Women in the World of Comics

Women in the World of Comics

As part of the debut of the library exhibition “In Her Own Image,” a panel discussion about women in comics was held to highlight the feminist implications of the UCSB Reads 2019 selection "The Best We Can Do," by Thi Bui. Panelists also described how women have built their own underground movements through the use of comics.

The Laramie Legacy: Remembering Matthew Shepard Through Theater

The Laramie Legacy: Remembering Matthew Shepard Through Theater

Judy Shepard visited UCSB to discuss the significance of her son’s murder and how it inspired the play “The Laramie Project,” which UCSB is now staging, directed by Eric Jorgensen, a PhD candidate in Theater and Dance. In 1998 when Matthew Shepard was just 21 years old, he was beaten, tortured and left to die in Laramie, Wyoming—a violent act fueled by anti-gay hatred. The wound of Matthew Shepard’s death has now been open for 20 years and produced a legacy that continues today.


Barbara Imhof: Space As A Place to Inhabit

Barbara Imhof: Space As A Place to Inhabit

Space architect and researcher Barbara Imhof spoke at UCSB about her current and past projects exploring human habitation of space. Her talk “The Stars Look Very Different Today (David Bowie)” was part of the Seminar series hosted by Media Arts & Technology.

Posing Questions On How To  'Define American'

Posing Questions On How To 'Define American'

Pulitzer prize-winning journalist and human rights advocate Jose Antonio Vargas visited UC Santa Barbara to speak about the challenges undocumented immigrants faced. He urged undocumented immigrants to stand up for legal recognition of their status in the United States. “When our presence is broadly criminalized, our very existence is an act of resistance,” said Vargas in a recent talk at Campbell Hall.

You Can Save a Life: 'Active Shooter' Training at UCSB

At the Active Shooter Preparedness Training hosted earlier this month by the Walter H. Capps Center, emergency physician Dr. Scott Sherr recounted the hurdles his team faced during the Las Vegas Music Festival shooting. Drawing from his experience, Sherr offered a major piece of advice for the general public to better prepare for future mass shootings.

Poetry for All: U.S. Poet Laureate Visits UCSB

Poetry for All: U.S. Poet Laureate Visits UCSB

The 22nd U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith came to visit UC Santa Barbara to share her poems and writing process. Before her talk in UCSB’s Campbell Hall, she spoke to poets and aspiring student poets at the Old Little Theatre in The College of Creative Studies, where Writing, English and Literature students asked questions about her inspiring poetry journey.

UCSB Welcomes the Year of the Pig

UCSB Welcomes the Year of the Pig

UC Santa Barbara’s Asian Resource Center (ARC) hosted a celebration for Lunar New Years last week with different Asian Pacific Islander clubs organizing activities and performances that showed off traditional aspects of different Asian cultures. “Lunar New Year is not only about family reunion and local communities. It is also about cultural diversity when celebrated globally such as today in this building,” said East Asian Studies professor Xiaorong Li.