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A New Magazine Gives Under-Represented Students a Voice

A New Magazine Gives Under-Represented Students a Voice

Second-year UC Santa Barbara student Frances Woo recently launched Um… Magazine, an online and print arts publication that aims to give marginalized communities a platform to showcase their art, writing, photography, and music.

 In a recent interview, Woo discussed the creation of the magazine and her plans for its future.

The Social Origins of the Minimum Wage

The Social Origins of the Minimum Wage

In her years researching the social origins of the minimum wage in the Western world, historian, author, and professor at SUNY at Binghamton Kathryn Kish Sklar discovered that American labor pioneer Florence Kelley’s efforts in the late 19th century to protect women and children in factories led to the minimum wage in America. Sklar shared these findings in a recent UC Santa Barbara lecture hosted by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy and the History Department.

Nepalis in New York: The Khora Ritual and Migration

Nepalis in New York: The Khora Ritual and Migration

Dartmouth anthropologist Sienna Craig discusses how a newer group of immigrants in New York, the Nepalis, are adjusting to a new way of life through khora, a pilgrimage and type of meditative practice.

Bret Rothstein on the Playful Intersection of Games and Art History

Bret Rothstein on the Playful Intersection of Games and Art History

Indiana University, Bloomington professor and UC Santa Barbara alumnus Bret Rothstein delivered a recent presentation titled “The Cheat, the Spoilsport, and the Virtuoso” to UCSB history of art & architecture students and faculty, describing the role of games in 16th century European artwork.

Coming to UCSB: Embark on a Virtual Excavation in Rome

Coming to UCSB: Embark on a Virtual Excavation in Rome

History of Art and Architecture professor Claudia Moser and Writing Program lecturer Christian Thomas have received a $94,000 grant from UC Santa Barbara’s Innovative Learning Technology Initiative (ILTI) to develop an interactive, game-based course called Rome: The Game. The lower division course, which will be available to students in winter 2021, is an introduction to the art, archaeology, and history of ancient Rome, with an emphasis on writing and research.

Defining Personhood: Slavery Through a Legal Lens

Defining Personhood: Slavery Through a Legal Lens

In a recent workshop, UC Santa Barbara English professor Jeannine DeLombard said American legal doctrine granted the status of ‘persons’ to slaves in order to prosecute them, a dynamic that lingered long after emancipation in the criminalization of African Americans.

“Slaves were recognized as criminally responsible, but not having civil rights,” DeLombard said. “And this is mapped onto African Americans today.”

Music Archive Restores Lost Cambodian Culture

Music Archive Restores Lost Cambodian Culture

During the Khmer Rouge reign of terror in Cambodia, possessing popular music was resulted in an immediate death sentence. Music archivist Nate Hun speaks to a UC Santa Barbara audience about his goal to recover and digitally restore vinyl recordings of Cambodian popular music from that lost era.

The 'Impatient Optimism' of Online Learning

The 'Impatient Optimism' of Online Learning

At a recent two-day conference called “Disquantified: Higher Education in the Age of Metrics,” leading analyst of technology in education Phil Hill spoke about the implications of digital courseware. The goal of the conference was to discuss the use of data and technology as a way to measure the quality of higher education and to drive policy change.

Bazerman Fellow Kathy Patterson Researches Blogging in College Writing

Bazerman Fellow Kathy Patterson Researches Blogging in College Writing

UCSB writing professor Kathy Patterson shared her recent research on incorporating blogging in first-year college writing courses during the 3rd annual celebration for the Charles Bazerman Endowed Faculty Fellowship for Professional Development in Writing. As the 2018-2019 recipient of the research fellowship, Patterson discussed the benefits blogging has on a college student’s motivation, writing process, digital literacy, and connection with their community.

Giffords Center Director Offers Hope for Gun Regulation

Giffords Center Director Offers Hope for Gun Regulation

As part of the recent memorial of the 2014 Isla Vista shooting, gun violence expert Robyn Thomas spoke at UC Santa Barbara about the future of gun safety in the United States. “It is an absolutely devastating crisis,” Thomas said. “But we have momentum on our side.”

Thomas is the executive director of the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and her talk was hosted by the Walter Capps Center for Ethics, Religion, and Public Life.

Raab Writing Fellows Showcase Their Work

Raab Writing Fellows Showcase Their Work

Booklets, musicals, websites, essays and short stories were just some of the creative mediums produced and presented by students at the Raab Writing Fellows Showcase last week at the Mosher Alumni House. For the third year in a row, the program has allowed students to embrace their passions and explore their topic of interest through year-long research under the mentorship of faculty members in the Writing Program. The program is generously funded by UCSB Trustee Diana Raab, an award-winning author and poet, and advocate for personal writing as a source of healing and empowerment.

'Shoah' Revisited: A Film 25 Years In the Making

'Shoah' Revisited: A Film 25 Years In the Making

Hosted by the Carsey-Wolf Center and the Religious Studies department at UC Santa Barbara, Brown University modern culture and media professor Regina Longo screened and spoke about her film “Shoah: Four Sisters” at an event recently at the Pollock Theatre.

“These films are points of confluence, death of family members and harshness of ghettos or concentration camps,” she told an audience of a campus and community members.

Urban Mapping: Exquisite Structures Designed Not to Last

Urban Mapping: Exquisite Structures Designed Not to Last

“It comes from the premise that we need a comparative frame for understanding cities in much of the world,” said professor Chattopadhyay in UCSB’s History of Art and Architecture department. In a recent talk, Chattopadhyay addressed the challenges of documenting temporary structures specifically in Kolkata, the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal, where structures are built for their annual Hindu religious festival called Durgapuja.

 MFA Grad Maiza Hixson Mounts A Multimodal Production

MFA Grad Maiza Hixson Mounts A Multimodal Production

It’s a “dystopian fiction tragi-comedy set in 2050” that explores “our desire of a technological utopia that is supported by human greed and inevitable climate change,” said Maiza Hixon, a graduating Master of Fine Arts student.

Hixon recently held a reading of her first written play Chimera at the Art, Design and Architecture Museum in conjunction with the opening of the 2019 MFA thesis exhibition Temporary Clash.

Sex Work as Activism: A Look at the History of Intimate Labor

Sex Work as Activism: A Look at the History of Intimate Labor

“Intimate labor and the workers who performed it have always been central to the history of capitalism,” University of Wisconsin historian April Haynes said in a recent talk at UC Santa Barbara. She argues that intimate labor and sex have always played an important part in the United States’ economy.

Haynes, a UCSB alumna, shared her research on intimate labor from the 1790s to the 1860s during her talk for the Center for the Study of Work, Labor and Democracy.

Loud and Proud: Celebrating the 28th Annual Pilipino Cultural Night

Loud and Proud: Celebrating the 28th Annual Pilipino Cultural Night

Pilipino Cultural Night (PCN) is the ambitious year-long project organized by students in Kapatirang Pilipino (KP), an organization which fosters a close-knit network of Filipinx-American students at UCSB to promote social, cultural, political, and academic ties within the community. The Filipinx student group just celebrated its 40th anniversary on the UCSB campus and serves as the powerhouse behind nearly three decades of Pilipino Cultural Nights.

“I learn about different indigenous cultures, and the dances that originate there and what inspired those performances,” a student said. “I learn about the hardships of the Filipinx people and become aware of matters in the past and present.”

Words Off The Page: New Orleans Poet Sunni Patterson:

Words Off The Page: New Orleans Poet Sunni Patterson:

“Great ancestors, you are breath, you are bridge, you carry us over tumultuous time,” recited New Orleans poet Sunni Patterson to a Tuesday evening spoken word event at UC Santa Barbara’s MultiCultural Center. As she does below, she conveys the beauty and pain of being human into words.

“We often say that living in New Orleans is an act of resistance,” she said. She described the area as both a home and a burial ground, where its residents avoid talking about slavery’s legacy on the city’s culture. When people start digging to build a pool, she said, they often find bones in the ground.

Revealing the Magic in the Poet's Process

Revealing the Magic in the Poet's Process

Visiting poet Tyree Daye says his process for exposing reality in a poem is more fantastical and imaginative than literal. “Imagination. Magic all day long,” Daye told a recent gathering of UC Santa Barbara students interested in poetry, or aspiring to be poets themselves. Daye recited selections of his work at the 2019 annual event to honor the Diana and Simon Raab Writer in Residence. 

Tangible Poetry: Lauren Gallaspy Conveys Humanity through Ceramics

Tangible Poetry: Lauren Gallaspy Conveys Humanity through Ceramics

“My work is about vulnerability, desire, and fear,” Los Angeles ceramicist Lauren Gallaspy said in an installment of the Spring 2019 Arts Colloquium. “I’m interested in the recolonization of the territory of our minds and our bodies.”

Gallaspy’s work explores the transitional state that separates life from death, and creatures from objects. She seeks to convey wholeness and brokenness in her ceramic pieces, breaking the rules of ceramics and completing the process in unorthodox ways. 

Science in the Service of the Cold War

Science in the Service of the Cold War

“Once you start seeing these links between Cold War propaganda and scientific freedom, you can’t un-see them,” Philadelphia-based writer, editor, and historian Audra J. Wolfe told a UC Santa Barbara audience. Wolfe discussed her recent book Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science as part of the Lawrence Badash Memorial Lecture Series, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center.