Viewing entries in
News

Violence, Memory, and History: Sharing Research in Latin American and Iberian Studies

Violence, Memory, and History: Sharing Research in Latin American and Iberian Studies

Violence, memory and history. That was the theme of the first ever Latin American and Iberian Studies graduate student conference, held this spring at UC Santa Barbara.

The conference gathered 24 graduate students from universities both in the United States and Europe. Each graduate student presented the topics they discussed in their thesis statements.

Katie Tur to UCSB Grads: Do what matters and keep having fun

Katie Tur to UCSB Grads: Do what matters and keep having fun

Commencement 2018 speaker Katy Tur of MSNBC tells UC Santa Barbara graduates in Humanities and Fine Arts and Social Sciences  how studying philosophy helped her navigate the world of broadcast journalism.

 “Do what you like. Do it for a cause that is bigger than you. And you will have fun,” Tur said at the Sunday, June 17, graduation ceremony. “Sometimes what makes a job fun is that it matters.”

Tur graduated from UC Santa Barbara in 2005, majoring in philosophy. She is author of the 2017 bestseller Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History.


UCSB's Reel Loud: Biggest in 27 Years

UCSB's Reel Loud: Biggest in 27 Years

Passion, innovation, and inspiring talent were on display at Campbell Hall last month at an annual student-run showcase for filmmakers, artists, musicians, and other performers. Students and the larger community applauded 12 of UC Santa Barbara’s filmmakers and other creative artists at the 27th annual Reel Loud Film and Art Festival where student-directed silent short films were accompanied by live on-stage music. Nine months of hard work and dedication from the Reel Loud organizing team paid off in an evening filled with musical performances, art features, and a room full of people ready to be inspired.

NEWS: Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Thesis Exhibition

NEWS: Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Thesis Exhibition

UC Santa Barbara’s master’s students in visual arts readied themselves for their next professional “moves” at a reception to exhibit their MFA thesis projects last week. The group titled its exhibition “The Chess Club” because they will apply the strategies they have learned in the program to sustain their future work and their careers.

The  MFA Thesis Exhibition Reception took place at the Art, Design & Architecture museum on campus and featured the artwork of seven graduates. The free event filled up quickly, with attendees including faculty from different departments and divisions, as well as other graduate and undergraduate students.

NEWS: UCSB Media Arts and Technology (MAT)'s 2018 End of Year Show

NEWS: UCSB Media Arts and Technology (MAT)'s 2018 End of Year Show

The Media Arts and Technology Program (MAT) at UC Santa Barbara presents its End of Year Show 2018, a celebration of the year's research in electronic music, emergent media, computer science, engineering, and art. The theme for this year is Invisible Machine, which represents the way that transformation is jumpstarted through the Media Arts. 

The MAT conducts research in the art of the “invisible becoming visible,” a process that can range from revealing the abstract processes between the input and output of a machine, to turning complicated scientific data into shapes and colors. Its technologists and artists seek to create new works that transcend the way that we currently view the world. 

NEWS: Fifteen Years Later— Time to Reframe Perceptions of Iraq

NEWS: Fifteen Years Later— Time to Reframe Perceptions of Iraq

For many U.S. college students, hearing mention of Iraq evokes images of soldiers, oil, refugees, and destruction. In 2003, the United States invaded the country and American soldiers remained there for roughly eight years. Those soldiers and the combat that surrounded them dominated U.S. media coverage, leaving little room for the stories of Iraqi civilians and the hardships they endured during and after the occupation.

Now, 15 years after the invasion, several departments at UC Santa Barbara came together for a symposium to flip the script and reframe U.S. perspectives on Iraq. “[The goal is to] re-orient us towards Iraq in order to overturn these reductive and insufficient representations of human beings,” said organizer Mona Damluji, a professor in the Film and Media Studies Department.

The two-day event, called “Iraq Front and Center” was held earlier this month to create a space for interdisciplinary conversations, bringing together guest speakers from the diverse perspectives of novelist, journalist, filmmaker, and doctor.

The Dynamics of Oppression: A talk by activist Kimberlé Crenshaw

The Dynamics of Oppression: A talk by activist Kimberlé Crenshaw

At a time when tensions are high over police violence against African Americans and sexual violence against women, hundreds of UC Santa Barbara students lined up to hear race theory and civil rights activist Kimberlé Crenshaw advise marginalized groups to go beyond marching under one banner.

“People are so convinced we are moving forward, they don’t realize we are passing the same terrain we’ve seen before,” Crenshaw said at Campbell Hall in a talk hosted by the Multi Cultural Center.

VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE: UCSB's First Indigenous Literature Conference

VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE: UCSB's First Indigenous Literature Conference

The Spanish and Portuguese Department earlier this month presented “Verbal Kaleidoscope” the first interdisciplinary conference at UC Santa Barbara dedicated to Indigenous literatures. Several poets of the Zapotec, Mazatec, Spanish, Basque, and other language groups recited their work in what organizer Osiris Gómez described as a display of diversity.

“Verbal Kaleidoscope is a metaphor for cultural and linguistic plurality, said Gómez, a Spanish and Portuguese Ph.D. candidate. “The world, even at a community level is immensely diverse…With every swirl, movement, transition, we face new challenges and promising forms.”

ANNOUNCING: The Charles Bazerman Faculty Fellowship in Writing

ANNOUNCING: The Charles Bazerman Faculty Fellowship in Writing

The UC Santa Barbara  Writing Program is pleased to announce the creation of the Charles Bazerman Endowed Faculty Fellowship for Professional Development in Writing. This endowed fund supports an annual, competitive, two-course fellowship for a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. 

Dexter Filkins Speaks on Today's Refugee Crisis

Dexter Filkins Speaks on Today's Refugee Crisis

Pulitzer prize winning journalist Dexter Filkins spoke recently at Corwin Pavilion about the modern refugee crisis and why he calls it “the great apocalypse of our time.” The talk was sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center’s Crossings + Boundaries series.

The New Yorker staff writer drew attention to the dire situations of 200 million migrants, coming mainly from South Sudan, Syria, and Afghanistan, who are living in refugee camps for an average stay of 10 years or internally displaced within their home countries.

Jewish American History Seen through a Revolutionary Prism

Jewish American History Seen through a Revolutionary Prism

“The story of American Jews is one of Americanization in linear and progressive terms…I want to present another way of understanding it, through the prism of revolution, of conflict and utopianism,” said Tony Michaels, PhD., a religious studies professor from University of Wisconsin-Madison, in a recent address in UC Santa Barbara.

Michaels has dedicated his career to researching the Jewish story in America and was presenting his new research for the first time as a guest of the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center’s Taubman symposia in Jewish Studies.  

Overcoming Divisions in America: The Lessons of Lincoln’s Legacy

Overcoming Divisions in America: The Lessons of Lincoln’s Legacy

Bestselling author Sarah Vowell credited Lincoln’s “magnanimous” personality and “reason” for his ultimate success in passing the Emancipation Proclamation that ended slavery, and said his respect for democratic institutions was crucial.

“If we die, we die by suicide, because we stop adhering to our constitution and the rule of law,” said Vowell, summarizing Lincoln’s message in his 1838 address in Springfield Illinois.  Vowell wrote 2005’s  Assassination Vacation, in which she traveled the country visiting site related to assassinated presidents.

New UCSB Digital Commons Promises Open Doors and Open Minds

New UCSB Digital Commons Promises Open Doors and Open Minds

When English professor Jeremy Douglass was first asked by Humanities and Fine Arts Dean John Majewski to head up a new wall-less collaborative space on campus, he wasn’t quite sure what to expect.  

“The vision was that the former arts library space (Music 1410) would become a campus center for public experiments in innovative research and teaching,” Douglass explained. “The initial focus on digital humanities expanded to embrace the arts as well, with Prof. Laurel Beckman proposing the name ‘DAHC’ – Digital Arts & Humanities Commons.”

Art for Therapy’s Sake: Suzanne Hudson looks at the legacy of TV’s Bob Ross

Art for Therapy’s Sake: Suzanne Hudson looks at the legacy of TV’s Bob Ross

Art therapy is not intended to train artists, but to instead make them happy, says Suzanne Hudson, an art history scholar at University of Southern California.

Hudson discussed the advent of art therapy and the role of television’s Bob Ross at UC Santa Barbara’s History of Art and Architecture winter lecture series. She is currently completing the research for her next book, Better For the Making:  Art Therapy Process.

Losing Dreamland: Drugs and Destruction in Small-Town America

Losing Dreamland: Drugs and Destruction in Small-Town America

Award-winning author and freelance journalist Sam Quinones told a packed UCSB McCune Conference room exactly what needs to happen for America to overcome the effects of a 20-years opioid epidemic:

“We have to question the drugs that are marketed to us, demand that the government stop allowing [drug] advertisements on television, depend less on pills as solutions and depend on our grocers to stock better food,” he said.

Canadian author David Bezmozgis speaks at UCSB about morality and Soviet Jewry

Canadian author David Bezmozgis speaks at UCSB about morality and Soviet Jewry

Novelist and filmmaker David Bezmozgis said his novel The Betrayers (2014) offers one “provocative” answer to the moral dilemma. “If we accept that there are sociopaths and psychopaths in this world, why would we not also accept that the opposite exists,” he asked. “That some people are good, because they are born that way? That there is a limit to how good anyone can actually be? The only way you will know is when you are tested.”

Finding Your Passion: Humanities and Vocation

Finding Your Passion: Humanities and Vocation

Students heard from social entrepreneur Jessica Jackley, author Reza Aslan, and producer Tim Kring about finding a career that “fits your passions,” as Jackley put it. A leader in international microlending, she said the humanities gave her the perspective that allowed her to navigate the world of non-profit global entrepreneurism. Jackley, who founded the non-profit microlending firm Kiva, had studied philosophy, poetry and political science.

NEWS: Montage Concert

NEWS: Montage Concert

Each year, the Music Department at UC Santa Barbara hosts "Montage," a concert open to the public highlighting the diverse musical talents on our campus. The 2017 showcase was held on Sunday, November 12 at the Trinity Episcopal Church in downtown Santa Barbara. HFA intern Giovanna Vicini spoke to Petra Peršolja, a graduate pianist, and Scott Marcus, chair of the Music Department, about their roles in the unique concert.