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carsey-wolf center

Bringing Back The Beatles

Bringing Back The Beatles

The Carsey-Wolf Center launched Beatles Revolutions, a series showcasing The Beatles’ impact on culture and politics in the US. The series kicked off at Pollock Theater with a screening of A Hard Day’s Night, followed by a conversation with journalist and author Ivor Davis. The next event takes place this Thursday, January 24th from 7:00-9:15 p.m. at Pollock Theater with Let It Be, a documentary directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, followed by a discussion with musician and producer Alan Parsons.

“We hope that those who attend the series will learn more about The Beatles both in the 1960s and beyond,” said Director of the Carsey-Wolf Center Patrice Petro.

NEWS: Fifteen Years Later— Time to Reframe Perceptions of Iraq

NEWS: Fifteen Years Later— Time to Reframe Perceptions of Iraq

For many U.S. college students, hearing mention of Iraq evokes images of soldiers, oil, refugees, and destruction. In 2003, the United States invaded the country and American soldiers remained there for roughly eight years. Those soldiers and the combat that surrounded them dominated U.S. media coverage, leaving little room for the stories of Iraqi civilians and the hardships they endured during and after the occupation.

Now, 15 years after the invasion, several departments at UC Santa Barbara came together for a symposium to flip the script and reframe U.S. perspectives on Iraq. “[The goal is to] re-orient us towards Iraq in order to overturn these reductive and insufficient representations of human beings,” said organizer Mona Damluji, a professor in the Film and Media Studies Department.

The two-day event, called “Iraq Front and Center” was held earlier this month to create a space for interdisciplinary conversations, bringing together guest speakers from the diverse perspectives of novelist, journalist, filmmaker, and doctor.

Filmmaker Werner Herzog rocks UCSB with tales of pursuing his vision in film

Filmmaker Werner Herzog rocks UCSB with tales of pursuing his vision in film

Gasps, yells, and laughter rocked the auditorium as Werner Herzog’s 1979 film Nosferatu the Vampyre screened at the Pollock Theater last week. The legendary German-born director was there to watch the film alongside nearly 250 enthusiastic UCSB students and community members.

Their spirited reaction was a fitting welcome to a director who is known for his originality and feistiness. But Herzog also displayed the humility of an artist who puts his work above all else. “I am just a quiet soldier of cinema,” Herzog told the crowd at one point, prompting applause.